Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Talk the torque

  1. #1

    Default Talk the torque

    So having just acquired a used road bike and upgrading a few parts I've noticed everything I've bought so far has a torque setting - bb, stem, cranks.

    Just wondering how many people are adjusting components to the required torque settings and if you are, what torque tools would you recommend.

  2. #2

    Default

    I use it on all the bolts. I really don't trust myself when tightening any bolts. I tend to over tighten

    It also makes a lot easier to undo the bolts cause you are not over tightening

    The only annoying thing is remembering each bolt's torque setting.

    I use one of these...http://www.wiggle.co.uk/effetto-gius...e-wrench-bits/

    Very good quality.

  3. #3

    Default

    I use it on all the bolts as well. Why? Cause I'm a tool junkie.

    I assume if I torque it probably things won't break, and I won't die. I use a combo of Sidchrome and Kinchrome stuff from Bunnings cause I get it cheap. If you want to borrow, be my guest!
    . . . . .

  4. #4
    Semi-Pro
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oberon NSW
    Posts
    2,287

    Default

    Yup

  5. #5

    Default

    A good quality torque wrench is a tool you will have for life and IMO well worth every $ you spend on it. It may save you stripped bolts and broken components and ouches!

    Quote Originally Posted by Lorday View Post
    I use a combo of Sidchrome and Kinchrome stuff from Bunnings cause I get it cheap.
    These are good quality and easily accessible, I have several in my tool box when I was a mechanic. They include brands like Warren & Brown, Snap On and Hazet and I used them pretty much every day for 8 years. It's a good habit to get into I reckon on bikes, cars, anything with a torque specification!

  6. #6

    Default

    Just make sure you get one that works at the lighter end of the torque spectrum.

    There are those that are made for lighter work such as bicycles and those that are for torquing down cylinder heads on trucks. You want the former. Like this...

    http://www.kincrome.com.au/web/catal...number=MTW200I

    The torque range is 2.0Nm to 24Nm, stem bolts are around 5Nm which is in that range.

    Grumps

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    Just make sure you get one that works at the lighter end of the torque spectrum.

    There are those that are made for lighter work such as bicycles and those that are for torquing down cylinder heads on trucks. You want the former. Like this...

    http://www.kincrome.com.au/web/catal...number=MTW200I

    The torque range is 2.0Nm to 24Nm, stem bolts are around 5Nm which is in that range.

    Grumps
    True, thank you Uncle Grumpy for pointing this out. I neglected to mention such in my post.

    I like torque my BB cups so I do use a bigger one for this application. About 40Nm from memory? Even though my 1/4" drive torque wrench goes up to 40Nm I don't like to use it above about 25nm, so the 3/8" takes over from there.

    Don't think I've ever used the 1/2" drive wrench on a bike...

  8. #8
    Sport
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Perth, WA
    Posts
    322

    Default

    I use a little digital one that attaches inline on a 1/4" drive ratchet where you just set the min and max specifications...

    Starts to beep as you reach the minimum and gets faster as you reach the maximum.

  9. #9

    Default

    Oh by the way - while grease is great for threads of bolts, it's not good under the head of the bolt - it reduces the friction and gives a 'false' reading - which means you ca nover torque you bolts.
    . . . . .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •